Brexit: The Artistic Comments

Hallow’s Eve has come and gone. Pumpkins are still in vogue. Leaves are falling. Christmas decorations are becoming visible. We officially have cold freezing weather. And the rain persists.

And Brexit continues.

Yes, the European Union and Great Britain extended the “exit day” from 31 October.

Again. Yet, again.

Misery and sighs of exasperation are welcome.

Woes and tribulations aside, economics aside, politics aside, the Brexit became a social phenomenon. We are all afraid of stepping foot on British soil even as tourists. Why? Nothing is stable. No one is sure if they’ll need a visa in two months, a month ago or in six months. Many of us write, analyze, and ponder the “how?”, “why?”, and “what?” of the last 3 years-and-a-half. From a policy analysis point-of-view, we have reached conclusions but no stable clarity of vision. Maybe a more creative approach is necessary.

So now, the Brexit is scheduled for 31 January 2020.

We read Christoph Niemann’s cartoon piece for the New York Times, relating his last stay in London. He describes the situation he sees in Westminster and recounts a history of what happened  (the “how?”, “why?”, and “what?”). He litters the story with anecdotes: his thoughts,  Churchill and different London HQ buildings, and history facts about how the Brexit happened.

[ Hint: It was a very long road to European membership and economic stability. It all ended because of nostalgia and “island feelings”. ]

His interpretation is a refreshing one on a crisis, which no longer makes sense. Nothing is clearer than art sometimes. As his piece’s title mentions, it is an illustrated guide. Notice one of the images show a box at the UK Parliament stating “We want your feedback”.

Well what is your feedback?

IMG_9673
Waiting for the Euro-star, Brussels. February 2018 ©le_chah_errant

We leave you with our favorite photo summing up our British stay (from Brussels Midi train station).

Note: We also read the #Brexit piece from Vox.

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